UG-CLAT CURRENT AFFAIRS AND GK QUIZ 2

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Question 1:

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

National Thermal Power Corporation Limited (NTPC Ltd) was founded in which of the following year?

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Question 2:

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Who among the following heads the National Crisis Management Committee?

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Question 3:

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Replace III-

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Question 4:

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Which of the following (II) hydroelectric project was destroyed by a glacier burst in February 2021?

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Question 5:

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Which of the following states/ UT’s is prone to flash floods (I)?

Around 125 people were missing in northern India after a Himalayan glacier broke and swept away a small hydroelectric dam on Sunday, with floods forcing the evacuation of villages downstream.

“It came very fast, there was no time to alert anyone,” Sanjay Singh Rana, who lives on the upper reaches of the river in Raini village, told Reuters by phone. “I felt that even we would be swept away.”

Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat said 125 people were missing but the number could rise. So far, the bodies of seven people had been recovered.

(I) is prone to flash floods and landslides and the disaster prompted calls by environment groups for a review of power projects in the ecologically sensitive mountains.

Earlier state chief secretary Om Prakash said 100 to 150 people were feared dead. A large number of the missing were workers at the 13.2 MW(II) Hydroelectric Project which was destroyed by the bursting of the glacier.

Twelve people who had been trapped in a tunnel had been rescued and efforts were under way to save others caught in another tunnel, the federal home ministry said after a meeting of the National Crisis Management Committee, comprising top officials.

State utility NTPC said the avalanche had damaged a part of its Tapovan Vishnugad hydropower plant that was under construction further down the river. It gave no details but said the situation is being monitored continuously.

Indian military helicopters were flying over the area and soldiers deployed for help with relief and rescue.

The neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous, put its riverside areas on high alert.

It was not immediately clear what had set off the avalanche at a time when it is not the flood season. In June 2013, record monsoon rains in Uttarakhand caused devastating floods that claimed close to 6,000 lives.

That disaster was dubbed the (III) because of the torrents of water unleashed in the mountainous area, which sent mud and rocks crashing down, burying homes, sweeping away buildings, roads and bridges.

Environmental experts called for a halt to big hydroelectric projects in the state.

“This disaster again calls for a serious scrutiny of the hydropower dams building spree in this eco-sensitive region,” said Ranjan Panda, a volunteer for the Combat Climate Change Network that works on water, environment and climate change issues.

“The government should no longer ignore warnings from experts and stop building hydropower projects and extensive highway networks in this fragile ecosystem.”

Question 6:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II) under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

The government of India has the right to mint coins in the range of-

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II)under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

Question 7:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II) under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

The first commemorative coin in India was issued with the image of-

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II)under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

Question 8:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II) under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

Where is the headquarters (III) of the Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) located?

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II)under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

Question 9:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II) under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in which of the following year (II)?

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II)under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

Question 10:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II) under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I). What is (I)?

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Friday launched the first colour souvenir coin on (I) on the occasion of 17th foundation day of Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL). 

The finance minister in her address stressed on upskilling and acquiring new skills, and upgradation to meet the technology driven economy. Further, she emphasized on ramping up the quality of products and to brand SPMCIL as lead producers of currency and other sovereign products. 

The minister was also joined by Economic Affairs Secretary Ajay Seth and other senior officials of the ministry, a finance ministry statement said.

Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India Limited (SPMCIL) was set up in (II)under the administrative control of the Union Finance Ministry. Its headquarters is at (III)

SPMCIL was set up by the government of India to bring all its production units engaged in minting of coins, production of security papers and currency notes printing units under one company.