RBI ASST ENGLISH QUIZ 3

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Question 1:

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges.  According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills:

The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts.

Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys.

They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast.

Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges.

It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris.

The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

According to the passage, by whom Black Percher has been spotted?

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills: The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts. Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys. They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast. Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges. It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris. The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

Question 2:

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges.  According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills:

The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts.

Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys.

They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast.

Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges.

It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris.

The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

According to the passage, Black Percher belongs to which Arthropoda?

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills: The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts. Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys. They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast. Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges. It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris. The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

Question 3:

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges.  According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills:

The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts.

Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys.

They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast.

Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges.

It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris.

The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

According to the passage, Dinesh Siddhartha has pursued which degree from SreeVidyaniketan?

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills: The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts. Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys. They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast. Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges. It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris. The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

Question 4:

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges.  According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills:

The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts.

Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys.

They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast.

Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges.

It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris.

The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

According to the passage, how long did it take to capture the image of black dragonfly?

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills: The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts. Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys. They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast. Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges. It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris. The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

Question 5:

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges.  According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills:

The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts.

Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys.

They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast.

Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges.

It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris.

The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

According to the IUCN, which insect comes under the Red list of threatened species?

Directions : Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Black percher or black ground skimmer (Di placodes Lefebvre), a species of dragonfly, was sighted for the first time in the Seshachalam Hill ranges recently. It belongs to the phylum Arthropoda, class insecta and order odonatan. Keen interested, Dinesh Siddhartha, a Tirupati-based wildlife photographer, clicked the species in the forest area abutting the city recently. The B.Sc. Microbiology graduate from Sree Vidyanikethan group started photography as a hobby, developed a keen interest towards macro photography and moved into the woods for an occasional click. “I have seen many insects in the forest but chose this black dragon fly as I somehow felt it was rare. It took four and a half hours for me to get a close view”. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’ in view of its wide prevalence in southern Eurasia and the whole of Africa. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. It is known to move near forest streams. Mr. Siddhartha has received a merit certificate during the recent Republic Day celebrations in Chittoor for having scored first in the wildlife photography in the district by capturing the image of aired dragonfly in the past. Though the black percher is not a rarity, he feels this documentation will go a long way in aiding further research on the species. About Black Percher: Black Ground Skimmer (Diplacodeslefebvrii), is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae known commonly as the black percher. It is a common species native to most all of Africa and southern Eurasia. The insect has been sighted in forest locations of Karnataka and coastal Andhra Pradesh, but this appears to be its maiden appearance in the Seshachalam ranges. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, Black Ground Skimmer was labelled in 2016 as of ‘least concern’. About Seshachalam Hills: The Seshachalam Hills are hilly ranges part of the Eastern Ghats in Andhra Pradesh. In 2010 it was designated as Biosphere Reserve. Seshachalam biosphere is spread over Chittoor and Kadapa districts. Formed during Precambrian time (i.e., earlier than about 540 million years ago), the ranges contain sandstone and shale interbedded with limestone and are highly dissected, with many longitudinal valleys. They are bounded by the Rayalaseema uplands in the west and northwest and the Nandyal Valley (formed by the Kunderu River) in the northeast. Tirupati, a major Hindu pilgrimage town and the Srivenkateshwara National Park are located in these ranges. It is home to a number of endemic species including the famous Red Sanders and Slender Loris. The native population of the reserve includes the tribes of Yanadis.

Question 6:

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic pay off will outweigh the high cost.

According to the passage, which of the following is the ability of latest generation telecommunication technology?

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.

Question 7:

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.

According to the passage, which mobile operator continues to lose subscribers?

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.

Question 8:

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.

According to the passage, how much should be the C-band frequency to work at its optimum potential?

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.

Question 9:

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.

According to the passage, 26 GHz enables the transport or backhaul of signals between?

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.

Question 10:

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.

According to the passage, which of the following is one of the reasons to delay the introduction of 5G?

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s Budget announcement that the Government proposes to conduct the “required spectrum auctions” in 2022 to facilitate the roll-out of 5G mobile phone services in "scale 2022-23 has understandably triggered speculation including about the feasibility of the timeline. The Government’s keenness to expedite the roll-out was framed by Ms.Sitharaman as being propelled by an appreciation of the latest generation telecommunication technology’s ability to serve as an enabler of economic growth and job creation. Commenting on the Budget announcement, Communications Minister Ashwini Vaishnav said TRAI was expected to submit its recommendations on the spectrum to be set aside for 5G by March, adding that the auction for the airwaves would be held soon after. While last week’s furry of announcements have raised the possibility that the next auction of telecom spectrum may be held within the next few months, there is little clarity on the approach the Government plans to take with regard to the crucial issues surrounding the introduction of 5G services. Foremost are questions around the particular frequencies the regulator is likely to recommend, the Government’s plans on pricing the spectrum, and most crucially, the very viability of the new technology, both for the telecom companies and the economy as a whole. With the "financially stressed private telecom service provider industry now reduced to a near duopoly, as Vodafone Idea continues to bleed losses and subscribers and even plans to convert some of its outstanding interest dues to the DoT into an equity stake that will make the Union government the largest shareholder, the sector’s appetite for the highly capital intensive 5G technology is unlikely to be substantial at the moment. That 5G represents an exponential leap in technology is beyond doubt. However, most countries that have commercialised 5G so far largely "and the technology still predominantly deployed as an upgraded replacement for 4G in terms of end use, with the industrial and public utility applications envisaged still at least a few years away. Also, for the new technology to work at its optimum potential the Government would need to not only offer the key operational frequencies including the below 1 GHz, the C-Band frequencies around 3.5 GHz, and the higher 26 GHz but also crucially enable the transport or backhaul of signals between the base stations and telecom operator’s core network by offering no- to low-cost E-Band airwaves. With the COVID-19 pandemic having shown up the existing mobile networks’ inadequacies in terms of reach, especially in enabling the delivery of education to remote and rural students, it may make the most sense to delay the introduction of 5G until policymakers are sure its economic payoff will outweigh the high cost.